"As societies build walls of separation between communities,
ICAAD works to remove each brick to illuminate our common humanity"

Building multidisciplinary partnerships & strategies to combat structural discrimination globally

Programs

We believe that women & girls can reach their full potential when systems are designed to include their experiences and voices, and existing patriarchal systems are disabled. Our programs expand access to justice and human rights education by using evidence-based solutions that are institutionalized in local communities affecting millions of women & girls.
We believe that the identity of marginalized communities must be safeguarded. This happens when their ethnic, national, religious, linguistic, political, or cultural backgrounds are not seen as antithetical to the State, but rather, as a driving force towards creating a pluralistic society. Ensuring equal dignity for minorities helps to ensure just and equitable systems.
The U.N. Universal Periodic Review (UPR) mechanism is central to how we monitor discrimination globally because of its universal coverage of human rights issues and ability to track States who have explicitly agreed to address human rights gaps by reforming their domestic policy. We train law students and civil society on law as an invaluable advocacy tool.

 

Featured Media

Informal Injustice? Customary Mechanisms and the Emerging Role of Community Paralegals

We're excited to share a fantastic guest post on informal justice mechanisms and the role of community paralegals from Akhila Kolisetty, ... Read More

ABCAustralia: Report finds gender biases in Pacific lead to shorter jail

ABC Australia did an excellent interview of co-author Emily Christie on ICAAD's report on the impact of gender bias in ... Read More

Report Reveals Concerns of Gender Bias in Courts in the Pacific Islands

December 10th, Honiara, Solomon Islands: Gender bias has affected sentencing outcomes in more than 50% of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) ... Read More

Meet the women fighting corruption and saving mothers’ lives in India

Corruption, a lack of political will and poor medical facilities are a lethal mix for new mothers in India’s Assam ... Read More

Global Pro Bono Report: Accessing Justice – 3 Year Anniversary Review

The Global Pro Bono Report shows the breadth and depth of ICAAD's ability to leverage multidisciplinary partnerships to catalyze social ... Read More

Serving Vulnerable Communities Globally: Introduction to ICAAD

Vision: As societies build walls of separation between communities, ICAAD works to remove each brick to illuminate our common humanity ... Read More

#RaiseYourShield

Great talk! "Dr. Prabhjot Singh is on a mission to makes healthcare more accessible. His “a-ha moment” came as he attended the funeral of one of his patients where he saw the man in context of his life and community, rather than the bare facts included on his chart. Singh realized that this man’s death had been the result of the collective failure of many systems—education, mental health, neighborhood safety, job placement, veteran support. In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Singh insists that we must discard our top-down approach to the healthcare system and that regardless of our leadership, the solutions won’t come from our government. We must rebuild our system from the neighborhood up." ... See MoreSee Less

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THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND LEGAL
ASSIMILATION OF SIKHISM, BUDDHISM,
AND JAINISM INTO HINDUISM

"Article 25, sub-clause 1 of the Indian Constitution guarantees
that “subject to public order, morality and health,
all persons are equally entitled to freedom of conscience
and the right to freely to profess, practice and propagate
religion.”38 However, its sub-clause 2 (B) and its corresponding
Explanation II is considered very controversial.
While Explanation I states that the wearing and
carrying of kirpans shall be deemed to be included in
the profession of the Sikh religion. Explanation II in
sub-clause 2 (B) states, “Hindus shall be construed as
including a reference to persons professing the Sikh, Jain
or Buddhist religion, and the reference to Hindu religious
institutions shall be construed accordingly.”39 This
constitutional provision is very discriminatory, as it connotes
that even as a multi-faith state, India seems to be
concerned about the social welfare of only one religion
(Hinduism) and its religious institutions. The appended
Explanation II effectively groups Sikhs, Buddhists, and
Jains into Hinduism. Explanation II has also led to other
discriminatory laws against these religions, including
the Hindu Succession Act (1956), Hindu Marriage Act
(1955), Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act (1956),
and Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act (1956). These
laws are largely viewed to force legal assimilation of
these religions into Hinduism, rather than recognizing
them as distinct religious identities."
... See MoreSee Less

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