"As societies build walls of separation between communities,
ICAAD works to remove each brick to illuminate our common humanity"

TrackGBV Updates: Case Law Analysis Begins, Global Transformation Conference, & Advocating to Support Survivors

5,000 Gender-Based Violence Cases Covering 12 Pacific Island Countries Are Being Analyzed

ICAAD, with its law firm (Linklaters; Manatt, Phillips & Phelps) and technology/ data science (Conduent) partners are engaged in a multi-year initiative to look at how gender bias influences judicial decision making in domestic violence and sexual assault cases.
After completing this analysis, ICAAD will be identifying a partner to build a comprehensive data dashboard so that local women’s rights advocates, the judiciary, universities, and other interested stakeholders can access disaggregated data that looks at patterns and practices of discrimination over 20 years of case law.
This will assist in subsequent monitoring, training, and advocacy for legislative and judicial reform. Furthermore, ICAAD will use this model to scale the initiative to other regions, and is currently looking at Africa and Latin America as potential options.

Global Transformation towards Gender Equality and Agenda 2030: A conversation about innovative approaches to break the cycle of violence against women

ICAAD was invited to present at the Global Transformation conference in Mexico City, which was hosted by the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights & Humanitarian Law (Sweden), American University Washington College of Law (USA), Centre for Human Rights at the University of Pretoria (South Africa), and Red Latinoamericana de académico/as del Derecho, with support of the Swedish Embassy.

Jaspreet Singh, ICAAD Co-Founder, presented and chaired the panel on: Case Studies on SGBV: Research Methodologies and Perspectives from the Field.

The presentation was specifically on Analysis of Judicial Sentencing Practices in GBV Cases in the Pacific Island Region. It included a discussion of how cases were analyzed and the impact of advocacy resulting from the project, as well as the potential to replicate the methodology in other jurisdictions.

Organisations speak out in defense of sexual assault survivors.

ICAAD joined with International women’s rights organisation Equality Now and 80 other leading women and human’s right groups to place a full page ad in the Washington Post expressing collective concern about attacks on Dr. Christine Blasey Ford since her story of sexual assault was shared. SDG 5 makes it clearly imperative that Gender Equality is objectively better for all, and as stated in the ad, “there can never be equality in a culture that normalizes or trivializes sexual assault and sexual harassment.” We are proud to stand with all the signatories of the statement published on September 27, 2018 in @washingtonpost. #WhyIDidntReport

#RaiseYourShield

This Civil Rights and Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we’d like to challenge you to reflect on how fear may have influenced your opinions, especially of others, and to take a step towards the courage to overcome those fears. Why the focus on fear you might ask?

Famed marketer and author Simon Sinek in his book “Start with Why” outlines six typical manipulations used in sales and marketing, one of which is the use of fear. On fear, Sinek says, “When fear is being employed, facts are incidental. Deeply seated in our biological drive to survive, that emotion cannot be quickly wiped away with facts and figures.”

In the current political atmosphere, in the U.S. and around the globe, fear is often used by politicians and campaigners to polarize debates and to demonize marginalized communities, using them as scapegoats for the real economic, social, and political challenges that societies face.

Martin Luther King, Jr. understood how important fear is, so much so that he gave a sermon on it named “Antidotes for Fear.” It’s worth reading in its entirety, especially because it recognizes the importance, necessity, and creativity of fear (kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/draft-chapter-xiv-mastery-fear-or-antidotes-fear). However, particularly pertinent section was highlighted by King’s wife Coretta Scott King in her book “My life with Martin Luther King, Jr”:

“First Martin spoke of the many kinds of fear that troubled men and women in this period of change and "calamitous uncertainty"— fear of illness or economic disaster, fear of personal inadequacy in our highly competitive society. More terrible was the fear of death, even racial annihilation, in this atomic age, when the whole world teetered on "a balance of terror . . . fearful lest some diplomatic faux pas ignite a frightful holocaust."

"Some fears are normal and necessary," he said, like the fear of snakes in a jungle, but when they become neurotic and unchecked, they paralyze the will and reduce a man to apathy or despair. He quoted Emerson, who wrote, "He has not learned the lesson of life who does not every day surmount a fear."

How, then, to overcome fear? First, Martin said, "We must un-flinchingly face our fears . . . this confrontation will, to some measure, grant us power. . . . "Second, we can master fear through one of the supreme virtues known to man— courage . . . courage is the power of the mind to overcome fear.”"

MLK Coretta Scott King Simon Sinek
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