"As societies build walls of separation between communities,
ICAAD works to remove each brick to illuminate our common humanity"

Mapping Discrimination Reports

UPR: United States of America (USA), 22nd Session, 2015

Executive Summary This report examines the United States’ (U.S.) compliance with its international human rights obligations in the protection of minorities and vulnerable groups from hate crimes and related discrimination. During the U.S.’ first cycle through the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), amongst 27 recommendations to the U.S. […]

Read more

UPR: Tajikistan, 25th Session, 2015

United Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review: Tajikistan Executive Summary The prevalence in Tajik society of conservative strains of Islam, combined with traditional practices predicated on the subservience of women and a lack of government action, has led to overwhelming structural discrimination against women. This is […]

Read more

UPR: Samoa, 25th Session, 2015

United Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review: Samoa Executive Summary Drawing on ICAAD’s research, this submission highlights issues of structural discrimination that impact women and girls in Samoa. The research examines Samoa’s compliance with its international human rights obligations on the issue of violence against women […]

Read more

UPR: Sierra Leone, 24th Session, 2015

United Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review: Sierra Leone Executive Summary Drawing on ICAAD’s research, this submission highlights issues of structural discrimination that impact women and minorities in Sierra Leone. The research examines Sierra Leone’s compliance with its international human rights obligations on the issues of: […]

Read more

UPR: Solomon Islands, 24th Session, 2015

United Nations Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review: Solomon Islands Executive Summary  Drawing on ICAAD’s research, this submission highlights issues of structural discrimination that impact women and minorities in the Solomon Islands. The research examines the Solomon Island’s compliance with its international human rights obligations on the […]

Read more

UPR: Nauru, 23rd Session, 2015

Since its last UPR Review, Nauru has taken some concrete steps to combat gender inequality and violence against women. Issues remain in terms of amending legislation to include a specific domestic violence law; better data collection; and ensuring that gender stereotypes and cultural norms don’t impact accountability […]

Read more

UPR: Austria, 23rd session, 2015

Despite the presumptions that come with its status as a developed Western European state, Austria has been criticized over its weak implementation of measures to reduce sexual and gender based violence against women and increase the protection of minorities and their rights. One of these is the […]

Read more

UPR: Rwanda, 23rd session, 2015

The report examines Rwanda’s compliance with its international human rights obligations, covering among other issues, gender based violence, gender equality, and treatment of ethnic and religious minorities. Rwanda continues to face a legacy of cultural tradition that subordinates women. Males remain in firm control of the household and its […]

Read more

UPR: Spain, 21st Session, 2014

The report examines Spain’s compliance with its international human rights obligations, covering: gender based violence, treatment of ethnic and religious minorities, treatment of  immigrants, unlawful detention, and law enforcement abuse. Focus of the Spain UPR 2014 Report: Violence Against Women / Reproductive Rights Situation of Ethnic Minorities Situation […]

Read more

UPR: Fiji, 20th Session, 2014

Drawing on ICAAD’s research, this submission highlights issues of structural discrimination that impactwomen and minorities. Furthermore, the research examines Fiji’s compliance with its international human rights obligations on the issues of: violence against women, women in the labor market, the unfair treatment of ethnic minorities, the LGBTIQ community, and […]

Read more

#RaiseYourShield

Great talk! "Dr. Prabhjot Singh is on a mission to makes healthcare more accessible. His “a-ha moment” came as he attended the funeral of one of his patients where he saw the man in context of his life and community, rather than the bare facts included on his chart. Singh realized that this man’s death had been the result of the collective failure of many systems—education, mental health, neighborhood safety, job placement, veteran support. In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Singh insists that we must discard our top-down approach to the healthcare system and that regardless of our leadership, the solutions won’t come from our government. We must rebuild our system from the neighborhood up." ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION AND LEGAL
ASSIMILATION OF SIKHISM, BUDDHISM,
AND JAINISM INTO HINDUISM

"Article 25, sub-clause 1 of the Indian Constitution guarantees
that “subject to public order, morality and health,
all persons are equally entitled to freedom of conscience
and the right to freely to profess, practice and propagate
religion.”38 However, its sub-clause 2 (B) and its corresponding
Explanation II is considered very controversial.
While Explanation I states that the wearing and
carrying of kirpans shall be deemed to be included in
the profession of the Sikh religion. Explanation II in
sub-clause 2 (B) states, “Hindus shall be construed as
including a reference to persons professing the Sikh, Jain
or Buddhist religion, and the reference to Hindu religious
institutions shall be construed accordingly.”39 This
constitutional provision is very discriminatory, as it connotes
that even as a multi-faith state, India seems to be
concerned about the social welfare of only one religion
(Hinduism) and its religious institutions. The appended
Explanation II effectively groups Sikhs, Buddhists, and
Jains into Hinduism. Explanation II has also led to other
discriminatory laws against these religions, including
the Hindu Succession Act (1956), Hindu Marriage Act
(1955), Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act (1956),
and Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act (1956). These
laws are largely viewed to force legal assimilation of
these religions into Hinduism, rather than recognizing
them as distinct religious identities."
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook